Sugar-free February: A quick starter guide

Cancer Research have launched a Sugar-Free February campaign to encourage people to go sugar-free for the month and raise money for the charity.

I’m keen to support, encourage and help everyone taking part in this initiative, so here’s a quick fire guide of tips & resources to help you make a go of sugar-free February with maximum ease!

1. Use the accountability

Not only is the Cancer Research sugar-free February raising money for charity but it’s also doing its part to reduce the nation’s sugar intake and get some new habits in play.

This combination provides some powerful accountability for you if you’ve previously found yourself struggling to make notable lower sugar changes by yourself.

After just successfully completing dry January myself and telling as many people I possibly could, I’ve witnessed the power of social accountability first hand – it works!

I’ve also witnessed accountability working through my experience coaching others around sugar. In many cases they’d sign up with me they’d immediately stop eating sugar before our first session…and that’s after years and years of not being able to stop eating it.

Social pressure, being accountable to people, having peer support REALLY works.

Make your sugar-free goals public via the Cancer Research sugar-free month and there’s more at stake there to help you through the inevitable challenges (which are even more satisfying to come out the other smug side of!).

If you want even more tips and ideas to keep you on the straight and narrow, read Stick to it: Handy strategies for sugar-free accountability

2. Download & geek up on the knowledge to help you

You don’t want to be let down by accidentally eating something you thought was sugar-free but in fact isn’t right? Super annoying. 

There are heaps of resources on the internet to get you up to speed quickly to ensure a plain sailing sugar-free February.

The Cancer Research themselves have published a printable guide and a wall-chart

I’ve also got a free 4-part video starter course and purchasable ebook with my best 101 sugar-free and eating out strategies (essential if you have a very social month ahead!).

I’d also recommend the resources section with my recommended products and these very popular posts:

3. Make an adapted version of ‘sugar-free’ goals that works best for you

When someone says ‘sugar-free’, it can mean a couple of different things.

Do you mean refined sugar-free?

Or completely sweetness-free?

Or just chocolate-free?

Natural sugars?

Sweeteners & sugar substitutes?

The confusion begins!!

If going sugar-free feels like climbing mount everest (which it’s ok if it does!), why not make a more sensible goal that fits you, your lifestyle and your knowledge level now.

You can still piggyback on the motivation and inspiration of the sugar-free February month but in your own style and way. 

For example:

  • Free yourself of sweet drinks sugar-free feb?
  • A month of only sugar-free biscuits and cakes? (make them with alternatives instead)
  • Half the sugar in your favourite hot drink for the month?

Here are 10 sugar-friendly goals to inspire you.

It’s totally OK if you make this more suitable to you rather that being completely sugar-free.

4. Plan your month in advance

If February is rife with sugar-filled social occasions, think ahead and PLAN – new habits, new foods, new activities. 

Plan what you will have instead, what you might say and how you’re not going to make a big fuss.

Tell all your valentines admirers now that you would prefer declarations of love in a none sweet form! (I’ve told all mine.. ha ha). 

This video I recorded might be helpful: How to say no to sugar (without feeling bad).

So GOOD LUCK!

There’s plenty there to get you started.

I hope you feel proud of  your efforts, raise some money for charity and find it a worthwhile challenge.

Are you planning on doing sugar-free Feb and what do you feel is going to be your biggest challenge in doing so? Comment below and I can try and help!

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